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. yesterday, our leadership team met with her stumbles and business leaders about averting the fiscal cliff and achieving a balanced approach the white house says it wants. i made clear we put real concessions on the line by putting revenues on the table right up front. unfortunately, many democrats continue to roll out sensible spending cuts that must rollup any agreement that will reduce our deficit. mr. bowles himself that there have been no serious discussion of spending cuts so far. unless there is, there is a real danger of going off the cliff. that will hurt our economy and cost american jobs. republicans have taken action to revert the fiscal cliff. to replace the sequestered and paid way for tax reform and entitlement reform. we are the only ones with a balanced plan to protect the economy, protect american jobs and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our countries debt crisis and get our economy going again and create jobs. right now, all eyes are on the white house. our country does not nee
the fiscal cliff is serious business, and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it, and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> i don't understand his brain so you should ask him. it's been weeks, at least two weeks, since we met at the white house and we're still waiting for a serious offer from the republicans. >> let's bring in minnesota congressman keith ellison, who was just re-elected as co-chair of the progressive caucus. there are reports out there right now that a deal may be taking shape that involves $400 billion, maybe even more, in what they call entitlement cuts over ten years, mostly from medicare. the progressive caucus, you're the chairman, you have drawn a line in the sand saying it simply won't support entitlement cuts. here's the question. how far would you go to oppose this? >> well, you know, i got to know exactly what the composition of this deal is. i really have only heard the reports you just repeated, so it's difficult to know exactly what they're talking about. i mean, really, we're making -- you're calling on me to make a decision with very limit
's happened over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious, as well. >> all right. so once again, here are the cliff notes right here. republicans on the hill are demanding trillions of dollars worth of debt reduction. that's pretty much fine with democrats who say the wealthy should foot the bill in the form of higher tax rates. and therein lies the catch because the republicans want the savings of federal spending cuts. that dispute blocking efforts to keep rates from rising on everyone. as scheduled on january 1st. this is a so-called fiscal cliff. january 1st. our news makers representative jim clyburn of south carolina, number three democrat in the house of representatives and number one i'm sure to a lot of people. hello. how are you? >> hey, don. thank you so much for having me. >> thanks for coming on. is speaker boehner right, though? as the clock is ticking, ticking toward january 1st, the talks haven't progressed in two weeks. is he right? >> well, i
of weeks. the going over the fiscal cliff is serious business and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. paul? >> [inaudible]. >> well, we had a very nice conversation last night. it was direct. and straightforward. but this assessment i give you today would be a product of both of those conversations. >> how much are you open to the idea of discretionary spending cuts as part of a down payment to get to a longer range solution on entitlements? >> there are a lot of options on the table including that one. andrew. >> [inaudible]. >> the day after the election i came here and made it clear that republicans would put revenue on the table as a way to begin to move the process to get this resolved. >> [inaudible]. >> revenue is on the table but revenue was only on the table if there were serious spending cuts as part of this agreement. it has to be part of the agreement. we have a debt crisis! we're spending too much. while we're willing to put revenue on the table we have to recognize it's the spending that is out of control. >>
with business leaders again today to talk about the consequences of going over the fiscal cliff. he's also claiming to call on congressional leaders to make sure we raise the debt ceiling without contention. the white house making the case that extending the bush tax cuts for the middle class is directly connected to the health of our businesses. companies need to know consumers will be able to spend and in his first post-election interview president obama again rejected the house republican counteroffer that is on the table. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> let's hope he sticks to it. >> g.o.p. leaders aren't only dealing with the president and congressional democrats they're dealing with a split within their own ranks. more conservative republicans don't want party leaders to compromise anymore than they think they already have. even though the republican plan offers u
the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> speaker boehner made very clear at his press conference that he thinks the ball is in your court and the president's court. he says democrats have got to get series about spending cuts. where is the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain so you should ask him. okay? >> reid making those comments to our own kate bolduan. i'm joined by dan lothian. dan, we're learning more about the white house plan to deal with the fiscal cliff. break it down for us. >> reporter: right. this is the plan that secretary -- treasury secretary timothy geithner took up to capitol hill yesterday. it calls for $1.6 trillion in tax increases over a ten-year period more than republicans had anticipated. in addition to that, $400 billion in spending cuts that will come later. much of that not really specified. we're looking at entitlements such as medicare. and then the plan also includes $50 billion in stimulus spending. democrats see this really as sort of the opening s
over the last couple weeks. going over the fiscal cliff is serious business and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> reporter: you had senate republican leader mitch mcconnell say after a meeting with geithner that he considered this is a step backward. and so all the rhetoric, all the talk here on capitol hill sounds pretty pessimistic at this point, guys. bill: we heard a little bit from chris van hollen. what is the latest reaction from democrats to republicans mike? melissa: democrats say if you don't like the president's plan, republicans where is your plan? where exactly are you going to generate more revenue. they're trying to draw the republicans out to put specifics out there in terms of what cuts they want to make to entitlements, feeling like that may hurt republican argument. bottom line, house democratic leader nancy pelosi says she thinks republicans will eventually see the light. melissa: why am i confident? because it is the right thing to do. the american people expect and deserve this to happen. it
to protect the family business, continue to grow while at the same time make sure we solve this fiscal cliff. look, each and every day as we walk the halls, you continue to ask the questions. you want the answers to solving the fiscal cliff. we put the offer on the table and the president now has to engage. the next 72 hours are critical. if he sits back and continues to play politics, that will give you the answer of where we're going. this is the opportunity for the country to lead and opportunity for the president to lead. >> as these fiscal cliff negotiations and debate continues, i think it's important to remember that washington doesn't have a revenue problem, it has a spending problem. and under this administration, under president obama, we have seen record deficits and a record debt accumulate, and yet he keeps demanding that we have seen record deficits and a record debt accumulate, and yet he keeps demanding that we raise taxes to pay for more spending. this will only hurt our economy. ernst and young has done an analysis of the president's proposal and said it will cost several h
person, everyone talks about what the fiscal cliff could do to small business, what obama care can do for small business, but you said we shouldn't worry about that so much, that we should get some sort of compromise in order to keep moving and keep talking and keep moving forward? >> well, i think that it was pretty clear during the course of the election and since and even in the president's speech today where he said he's willing to give on some revenue and some spending cuts, he's proposed some, he's already passed some into law. and beyond that, just from my perspective, what i see is that we know that we're a confidence-based economy, we're 70% of the economy driven by consumer spending and anything that puts a crimp in consumer spending is not good for the economy. so to put a tax rise, a tax rate increase for the middle class makes no sense to me. someone who makes 50, 60, $70,000 a year will lose and will take away a lot of discretionary purchases from people like me and travel and a whole host of other areas. i hope our leaders in washington are listening and they take the s
over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> we can debate at length whether the november 6th election was a mandate, but i don't think we can debate the basics that it was a work order, a work order from the american people to members of congress and to the president, roll up your sleeves, work together and solve the problems. we got the message. did speaker boehner get the message? because the message was work together. what we hear from him is all of his pain and frustration and angst dealing with the tea party in his own caucus. well, there comes a point when he needs to look beyond his caucus to the house and to the nation. >> all right. welcome back to "morning joe." >> i guess the more things change, the more they stay the same. it's depressing, you're right, harold, we've seen this movie before. this was a year ago. this happened a year ago. and i know the media says oh, it's the republicans' fault any time the house doesn't co
'm disappointed in where we are. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> reporter: house democratic leader nancy pelosi quickly dismissed boehner's remarks as a negotiating maneuver. >> i think they'll come around. it's a tactic. it's a tactic. >> reporter: but you hear a strikingly similar message from other top democratic leaders saying the ball is in the republicans' court. >> we are waiting for some specifics somewhere from our republican colleagues to show that they're serious on negotiations. >> reporter: as the country fast approaches the fiscal cliff, the two sides are talking past each other. democrats say they've laid down their marker hiking tax rates on wealthier americans. and it's up to republicans to propose specific spending cuts they want to entitlement programs. however, republicans say they've offered a concession putting revenue on the table. and they say it's now up to the president and his fellow democrats to feel some pain and propose cuts in medicar
. recently he published a report assessing the challenges of approaching the fiscal cliff and the most effective way to achieve long-term, fiscal stability. he received his phd from the university of pennsylvania. that will be a recurring theme in these introductions. [laughter] dr. zandi, thank you for being here. dr. hassett is the director and senior fellow at the american enterprise institute. he holds a phd from the university of pennsylvania. his research includes the u.s. economy, tax policy, and the stock market. he is previously a senior economist at the board of governors at the federal reserve system. he went to that graduate school of business at columbia university. he has worked for both the george w. bush and clinton administrations. both of you went to the same university. i'm sure you can agree on everything today. dr. zandi first. >> thank you for the opportunity. it is an honor to be here with heaven, a good friend of mine. let me say -- kevin, a good friend of mine. let me say that these are my own personal views. lawmakers have to resolve three issues -- first, the
are mired in conversations about a fiscal cliff on the very right now. we're talking about long-term infrastructure build-out, a long-term energy plan. what role should c.e.o.'s have and the federal government have in making sure this gets done? >> this is the perfect opportunity for the federal government and for state governments to work together to achieve a common goal, right? there's plenty of times where, when we run a business, our interests might not coalesce with the interests of either of the parties. as fred said, this is the opportunity that we have never had in this country before, where you can have consumer, the business and the governments all working together to take advantage of this huge resource, if you want to call it saudi america. from a waste management perspective, for us it makes so much sense, because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 equivalent with natural gas and $4.10 diesel, so it makes great sense for our business. from a government point of view everybody today is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. our recommendations in the repo
-called fiscal cliff is a solvable problem. critical as the holidays approach and businesses make investment and hiring decisions for next year. while polls show many americans are pessimistic, there's optimism in this home. >> i got a sense that he's confident that what's best for the american people will happen. >> yeah. >> reporter: you agree? >> yes. >> i do too. >> reporter: but for now, the gop's resisting any tax increases even on those upper income americans. house republicans of course have made the counteroffer with $800 billion in new revenue and an overhaul of the tax code. wolf, they feel as if they have moved the ball, but they don't believe that the president is interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> these negotiations, dan, they usually go until the bitter, bitter end. a lot of folks are assuming that before that end there will be a deal. give us a flavor of the mood at the white house. >> reporter: well, i think they're preparing for this fiscal cliff scenario to play out, wolf. but as you point out when we look back over the last three years, we've had these kinds of n
in washington on the so-called fiscal cliff. president obama plans to enter questions from business members. the group has been urging action to prevent huge automatic tax increases in january. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. [video clip] >> we have not coordinated care. all these services have so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating. you have to step back and ask, are we hurting people overall? what are we doing? now we have the report saying 30% of everything we do not be necessary in health care. 30% of medications we subscribe, the test and procedures we order. this is something for the first time been called out as a problem. >> this function in the health- care industry. what hospitals will not tell you. urday night at 10:00 p.m. on c-span2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we have been focusing on different aspects of the fiscal cliff. we want to look at capital gains tax and the estate tax. what is the estate tax? guest: it goes back to history -- it was put in place to prevent the united states from developin
in april, 2011. the last minute on the fiscal cliff -- i do not think it is a good way to do business. it seems to be the way we are doing business in this town. host: if we were to go over, what happens? guest: probably, congress would be back in session quickly and we would do something but i am talking about right now, hopefully, and continue to negotiate. it is not to question of dollars and cents. some people have said we could let the rates go up and the republicans could take something down and they could call that a tax cut. people would lose faith in the institution and political leadership. trust is a funny commodity. you have it until you do not. you do not get it back if you lose the trust and then do the right thing the next day. we should convince the country, the markets and the world that america can make smart decisions and tough compromises. this would be a step in the right direction of showing we can work together, and we could put the people first. we have differences and we could fight without putting them in harm's way. host: roger altman writes in "the financia
. >>> americans could be singing the blues if congress doesn't act to avert the fiscal cliff. the longer congress waits the more complicated for businesses to figure out how much to pay workers early next year. the confusion could cost employers money, especially small businesses which use payroll software which takes time away from running their business. starbucks ceo howard schultz agrees. >> this single issue has a seismic affect on the rest of the world that we have never been as connected in the domino effect of a bad outcome here will have significant negative consequences domestically and around the world. >> negative consequences, seismic or not, none is stopping starbucks plans for 1,500 more cafes across america next year. and just as many around the world. but we get his point. >>> speaking of the fiscal cliff, we know what the parameters of a deal in congress will look like, right? on taxes, republicans give in to raise taxes on the wealthiest 2% and democrats will agree to rein in tax breaks, right? democrats are fighting hard to preserve the tax deduction for state and local taxes,
the last minute on the fiscal cliff. i don't think it's a good way to do business. >> host: if we were to go over, what happens? >> guest: well, you know, probably congress would be back in session pretty quickly and hopefully we would do something like i'm talking about right now. that's what we should do it early. and continue to negotiate. it's not just a question of dollars and cents. effort some people say let the race club in republicans get some data call that a tax cut. people lose faith in the institution and the political leadership. trust is a very funny commodity. you have it until you don't. when you lose the trust of the american people it's not like you get back to doing the right thing the next day. we should convince the country and the markets that can make smart decisions and to compromise and again this would be a step in the right direction of showing we can work together. we can put the american people first. again, we can continue to fight over things without putting them in harms way. >> host: robert altman writes today in the "financial times" by the fiscal cli
don't know what the fiscal cliff is, you've probably been living under a rock. i found this explanation. this is mr. burns from the simpsons. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver all the money, he'll drive you over a cliff. it is just -- >> what actually will happen if america does head toward that fiscal cliff? and go over it even temporarily? cnn money's jean zahadi has been on this story from the very beginning. here is the question at hand. a lot of people are saying, what happens if we don't get a deal right by the end of december and we get into early january, maybe go over the cliff for a week or two? is that catastrophic? >> it doesn't have to be. there are steps the government can take to mitigate the impact of the spending cuts and the tax increases. but legislative and budget experts i talked to say that really assumes a lot of things. one, that congress will act quickly, which can it do if it wants to, but, you know, can they cut a deal in january that they couldn't cut in december? that's one question
and then went out of business. >>> and here's what's passing for progress to avoid that fiscal cliff at year's end. president obama and house speaker john boehner spoke about it on the phone with one another. that discussion came as treasury secretary tim geithner confirmed mr. obama is prepared to take the economy over the cliff unless republicans agree to raise tax rates on the wealthy. >>> meantime in georgia, some activists expressed frustration about the stalemate in holiday spirit. they delivered symbolic lumps of coal to the offices of both of their state's u.s. senators. but security guards met them outside of republican saxby chambliss' office. eventually, a few were let inside, but without the camera and media present. of course. that would have been the real story. >> folks are upset now. see what happens january 1 after you get the first paycheck and go, oh, this is what the fiscal cliff meant. yeah. whoo, 2013. >>> all right. the next story involves a new grassroots campaign that is starting. meant to draw attention to the nation's debt crisis. it is our "favorite story of the d
, then they're going to risk the whole economy in going over the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's sustainable. i don't think people fully understand, what the president is saying is 100% of american families and small businesses get continued tax relief on their first $250,000 in income, and on the income above that amount, higher income people would be paying the same rates they did during the clinton administration, which is four more cents on the dollar. and, again, i don't think that's at all unreasonable. the president talked about this at length during the presidential campaign, and i believe -- i think people like tom cole, a conservative republican in oklahoma had it right when he warned his colleagues they would look totally obstructionist if they allowed that to happen. >> congressman, also included in the president's plan was that $200 billion in new stimulus measures. mention the word stimulus to republicans, and, well, they're not too happy with that word. so why do that? why deliberately like -- it seems like it was a deliberate poke in the side. >> no, carol. this
there in time for christmas. michael, on your deadline fiscal cliff we know when it happens january 1. the president's got his plan, the republicans have sort of a plan. the center for american progress came out with its own this week, why? you don't think the others are good enough? >> well, what we saw as a real need was a plan for comprehensive tax reform. not just nibbling around the edges but really trying to do something big and bold that would not only raise the revenue that we need and we do absolutely need to raise revenue but fix the problems in the tax code and we don't think that that's something that's going to happen in the next three weeks. we do think that that's something that's going to happen or could happen over the next year. and the parameters for that might be agreed upon in the next few weeks. we really wanted to put that out there and say listen, here are some really good ideas on how to really fundamentally reshape -- >> bill: first two or three points, what are you proposing in terms of raising the
the recovery started. now, i'm not going to blame it all on the fiscal cliff. we have a slowing economy. we have slowing economies around the world. but i was at a dinner with a bunch of ceos in washington who are interested and care about this fiscal issue on monday night. and they were talking about we're not hiring. we're allowing attrition to happen. we're holding back on big spending. we want to see what happens here before we go forward. what's interesting about this is that the consumer seems to have a different view. the consumer -- for the consumer so far, this has sort of passed by. i wouldn't say blissful ignorance, but it has not affected their behavior. you had a fairly strong set of economic numbers this fall. the housing market seems to have finally turned up after a period of obviously deep decline. and so consumer confidence, which is one of our best proxies for this kind of thing, has been turning up and really does not yet -- the fiscal cliff does not yet seem to have penetrated their consciousness. for those of us who were in stores over the holiday weekend, stores are c
is listen to their constituents wrrn it's important to note that families are struggling. having a fiscal cliff situation, going on inside the beltway, has a rippling reprecussions for people outside the beltway. we heard stories from people like ruthy who shared with us that her husband is a small business owner. he runs a catering company. because of the economic downturn, he has had fewer clients, which has meant they cannot make ends meet on her salary at a nonprofit and his salary to raise their two children, and, in fact, their phone was recently turned off. they're very concerned about having to pay more taxes just because congress can't end this fiscal cliff fiasco. >> you might have misunderstood the question. what do you think the mom kz do? what do you think, you know, families can do or should be doing to try to help the situation, obviously, because you've got some people who argue, well, you know, maybe there ought to be major cuts when it comes to medicare or medicaid or reforming social security, that kind of thing? >> well, we absolutely 1150% are hearing from moms across
of an agreement for the fiscal cliff? >> we're not going to negotiate over what is a fundamental responsibility of congress which is to pay the bells that congress incurs. it should be part of the deal, it should be done, and it should be done without drama. we cannot allow our economy to be held hostage again to the whims of an ideological agenda. it's -- we are the united states of america. we are the greatest economy on earth. we pay our bills, we always have. if congress wants to reduce spending, that should be part of the negotiations. that go into making digs about how we spend -- the programs we spend money on. and the president is very interested in reducing spending an reducing our deficit but you don't default on the economy. that is -- we saw -- we saw what happened in 2011. and it's unacceptable. >> disease did the president have a chance to speak to any republicans last night at the reception here about the fiscal cliff? >> the president and first lady met with scores and scores of lawmakers last night, as is the norm in a situation like this, but i'm not going to read out individu
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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